Benefice of Seaview, St Helens, Brading & Yaverland
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St Helen's Tricentenary Celebrations

Image of Tricentenary Logo
Image of Treble Clef Image of red flower MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK
Please come and help make the
300TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATIONS
of St Helen's Church a huge success
Image of burning candles symbolising 300 years
WHEN?
(please make a note in your diary)

21 - 23 June 2019   Flower Festival
22 June 2019   Saturday Evening Concert
23 June 2019   Special morning celebratory service with the Bishop of Portsmouth, followed by light refreshments

How can I help?
By offering help in advance so that we can plan the event well

What help is needed?
Setting up, flower-arranging, cake-making, donating a raffle prize, adding your name to the rota for stewarding in the church, serving refreshments, helping with the raffle, cake stall and sales table

Please can we borrow?
Photos of church events/weddings etc, any artwork depicting our church, a dressmaker's dummy / manikin

PLEASE CONTACT MARY ON 872326 IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO HELP

Image of Treble Clef Image of red flower

MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL
COME AND BE A PART OF ALL THE FUN!

This year marks the three hundredth anniversary of the consecration of the new Church of St Helen that replaced the old Church on the Duver that had been washed away by the sea.

In the year 704 A.D., Bishop Wilfred (c.633 to 709) sailed to the Island and landed at Brading Haven. A few years later, his chaplain, Hildila, built a church, almost certainly of wood, on the Duver.

In the year 998, when Ethelred (the Unready) was King, the Danes gained complete mastery of the Island leaving a trail of destruction. It is probable that the wooden church of Hildila was burnt to the ground during this incursion.

Following the foundation of a Priory at St Helens in the late 11th or early 12th century, the monks built a new church of stone, which also served as their chapel, adding a tower during the reign of Henry III (1216 to 1272}.

The church fell into a state of disrepair following the departure of the monks when alien monastic orders were suppressed during the reign of Henry V (1413 to 1422).

By the middle of the seventeenth century the buiding was in a state of almost complete ruin. With the exception of the tower, the church was eventually washed into the sea.

The tower was bricked up as a seamark in 1703 and remains to this day. In 1717 work began on building a new church further inland that was completed two years later and consecrated by Bishop Trelawney, Bishop of Winchester, on 27th June 1719.

This June we are celebrating the 300th anniversary of that consecration.

Please click here to learn about our Tricentenary Appeal to raise funds so that our 18th century church can meet the 21st century needs of our parishioners.

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